Scholar Watch:
Nibley Fellowships Assist Rising Scholars

For a number of years FARMS has sponsored a graduate fellowship program that gives financial aid to students pursuing advanced degrees in fields of special interest to FARMS. Named in honor of eminent Latter-day Saint scholar Hugh Nibley, the Nibley Fellowship is made possible by generous donations from individuals committed to helping further the mission of the Foundation.

The goal of the program is to foster the next generation of faithful scholars who will contribute to the work of FARMS. To this end, FARMS awards several fellowships each year to students pursuing M.A. or Ph.D. degrees in accredited programs at universities throughout the United States and abroad. Depending on the availability of funding and the number of successful candidates each year, awards range from a few hundred dollars to several thousand dollars per year. Fellowship recipients can use the funds however they choose.

Although FARMS strives to help as many qualified applicants as possible, the award process is competitive. Fellowships are not automatically granted or automatically renewed. Successful candidates must be pursuing their graduate studies in areas directly related to the work and mission of FARMS. For an application, write to M. Gerald Bradford, director of research at FARMS. The deadline is 1 June. Current Nibley fellows seeking to renew their fellowships must reapply by the same deadline each year.

In the past four years FARMS has awarded a total of 38 fellowships. Following is a list of Nibley fellows during that period, identified by name, field of study, university, and expected degree.

 

1998–99

 

Dan Belnap, Ancient Near Eastern Studies, BYU, M.A. program; David Bokovoy, Judaic and Near Eastern Studies, Brandeis University, M.A. program; Mark B. Child, Classic Maya Civilization, Anthropology, Yale University, Ph.D. program; Carl Griffin, Early Syrian Christianity, School of Arts and Sciences, Catholic University of America, Ph.D. program; Taylor Halverson, Biblical Studies, Yale Divinity School, Yale University, M.A. program; Melissa Halverson, Hebrew and Greek, Yale Divinity School, Yale University, M.A. program; Frank F. Judd Jr., New Testament and Early Christianity, Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ph.D. candidate (writing dissertation); Jennifer C. Lane, Early and Medieval Christian Thought, Claremont Graduate University, Ph.D. candidate (writing dissertation); Jared A. Ludlow, New Testament and Early Christianity, Graduate Theological Union and University of California, Berkeley, Ph.D. candidate (writing dissertation); Kerry Muhlestein, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles, Ph.D. program; Boyd Peterson, Bible as Literature, Comparative Literature, University of Utah, Ph.D. program; Becky Lyn Schulthies, Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Brigham Young University, M.A. program; John S. Thompson, Egyptology, Asian and Middle Eastern Languages, University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D. program.

 

1997–98

 

Mark B. Child, Classic Maya Civilization, Anthropology, Yale University, Ph.D. program; Allen J. Christenson, Pre-Columbian Maya Art History, Art History, University of Texas at Austin, Ph.D. program; Allison D. Clark, Early Christian and Medieval Studies, School of Theology, Boston University, M.A. program; Carl Griffin, Early Syrian Christianity, School of Arts and Sciences, Catholic University of America, Ph.D. program; Brian M. Hauglid, Arabic Studies, Middle East Center, University of Utah, Ph.D. program; Frank F. Judd Jr., New Testament and Early Christianity, Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ph.D. program; Jennifer C. Lane, Early and Medieval Christian Thought, Claremont Graduate School, Ph.D. program; Jared A. Ludlow, New Testament and Early Christianity, Graduate Theological Union and University of California, Berkeley, Ph.D. program; Becky Lyn Schulthies, Ancient Near Eastern Studies, Brigham Young University, M.A. program; I. Andrew Teasdale, Instructional Systems Technology, University of Indiana, Ph.D. program.

 

1996–97

 

Allen J. Christenson, Pre-Columbian Maya Art History, Art History, University of Texas at Austin, Ph.D. program; Allison D. Clark, Church History, School of Theology, Boston University, M.A. program; Carl Griffin, Early Syrian Christianity, Early Christian Studies Program, Catholic University of America, M.A. program; Brian M. Hauglid, Arabic, Middle East Center, University of Utah, Ph.D. program; Kristian S. Heal, Syriac Studies, Wolfson College, Oxford University, M.A. program; Frank F. Judd Jr., New Testament and Early Christianity, Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ph.D. program; Jennifer C. Lane, Early and Medieval Christian Thought, Claremont Graduate School, Ph.D. program; Jared A. Ludlow, New Testament and Early Christianity, Graduate Theological Union and University of California, Berkeley, Ph.D. program; Eric E. Vernon, Biblical Studies, Divinity School, Yale University, M.A. program.

 

1995–96

 

Allen J. Christenson, Pre-Columbian Maya Art History, Art History, University of Texas at Austin, M.A. program; John Gee, Egyptology, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Yale University, Ph.D. program; Carl Griffin, Early Christian Studies, Catholic University of America, M.A. program; Frank F. Judd Jr., New Testament and Early Christianity, Religious Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ph.D. program; Anthony Rivera Jr., Biblical Hebrew, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles, Ph.D. program; Gaye Strathearn, New Testament Studies, Claremont Graduate School, Ph.D. program.