Contributors

S. Kent Brown is the current director of FARMS and a professor of ancient scripture at Brigham Young University (since 1971). He was the director of the BYU Jerusalem Center for Near Eastern Studies (1993–1996) and has published a number of studies on the book of First Nephi. He was a fellow of the American Research Center in Egypt and received a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to microfilm more than 1,500 early Christian manuscripts in Cairo and Jerusalem.

David Butler Cummings received an AB in physics and an MS in electricalengineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He worked in high voltage pulsed power technology development, mostly in controlled fusion research, and retired from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He has served three missions, two of them with his wife, Lola, and now serves in a stake family history center, as a temple sealer, and as a patriarch. They are the parents of five children, eleven grandchildren, and twelve greatgrandchildren.

Ryan W. Davis studies political philosophy at Princeton University. He also teaches Sunday School in the Princeton First Ward.

Larry EchoHawk has been a law professor at Brigham Young University’s J. Reuben Clark Law School for the past twelve years. Prior to joining the faculty, he served as the Attorney General of Idaho (1990–1994), in the Idaho House of Representatives (1982–1986), and as the Prosecuting Attorney for Bannock County, Idaho (1986–1990). In 1995 he was the first BYU graduate to receive the prestigious NCAA Silver Anniversary Award given to former college athletes who have made significant professional and civic contributions in the 25-year period following their graduation.

Paul Y. Hoskisson graduated from Brandeis University in ancient Near Eastern studies. He currently holds a Richard L. Evans Professorship and is a professor in ancient scripture at BYU.

Val Larsen is associate professor of marketing at James Madison University. He holds a PhD in marketing from Virginia Tech, a PhD and MA in English from the University of Virginia, and a BA in philosophy and English from Brigham Young University. His published research includes articles on consumer psychology, Mormon material culture, and the fiction of Flannery O’Connor.

Larry E. Morris is a writer and editor with the Maxwell Institute. He is the coeditor (along with John W. Welch) of Oliver Cowdery: Scribe, Elder, Witness, published in 2006 by the Maxwell Institute, and has also published articles about Oliver Cowdery in BYU Studies and the FARMS Review. He received a master’s degree in American literature from Brigham Young University.

Michael D. Rhodes earned a master’s degree in physics from the University of New Mexico and did graduate work in Egyptology at Johns Hopkins University, the Freie Universitπt Berlin, and Oxford University and in archaeology at the University of Utah. He is an associate research professor of ancient scripture at Brigham Young University.

John S. Welch is a retired attorney living in La Cañada, California. He earned his law degree from Harvard Law School and practiced his entire career in the Los Angeles—based firm of Latham & Watkins. He and his wife, Unita, served a two-year service mission as faculty members at BYU—Hawaii.